Archive for August 8th, 2012

Required PD for CTE Courses for Mathematics or Science Credit

This post also appeared in the ESC Region XIII Curriculum Council Blog Required Professional Development for CTE Courses for Mathematics or Science Credit Notice On Monday, August 6th, TEA sent a “To The Administrator Addressed (TAA)” letter * in…

Required Professional Development for CTE Courses for Mathematics or Science Credit Notice

This post also appeared in the ESC Region XIII Curriculum Council Blog Required Professional Development for CTE Courses for Mathematics or Science Credit Notice On Monday, August 6th, TEA sent a “To The Administrator Addressed (TAA)” letter * inf…

More area schools fail federal standards

More area schools failed to meet federal standards based on the No Child Left Behind Act, data just released by the state show.

Austin and other local districts are among the thousands of districts nationwide that are classified as failing to meet the Adequate Yearly Progress, AYP, because of tougher passing standards.

This is the fourth consecutive year the Austin school district failed to meet the federal standards.

Forty-eight percent of all schools in Texas failed to meet the standards, according to data released by the Texas Education Agency.

Round Rock, Leander, Pflugerville, Hays and Georgetown also were among local districts that failed. Even the Dripping Springs school district, which was one of the few districts locally that passed last year, failed to meet the standards.

In the Lake Travis school district, which also passed last year, had its high school campus fail to meet standards, though the district as a whole passed. Last year, only a handful of area districts met federal standards overall and at every campus; this year, Eanes was one of the only area districts to achieve both.

The 2012 reading standards were increased from 80 to 87 percent, math standards from 75 to 83 percent. All students must meet the math and reading standards by 2014.

Districts or schools that miss AYP for two or more years and receive Title I funding, federal funds for low-income students, are subject to state sanctions and a school improvement program. Non-Title I schools that miss the standards must revise existing campus improvement plans to address why they missed the standards.

Last summer, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said that without a revamp of the 2002 No Child Left Behind Act, 82 percent of all schools nationwide could be classified as failing this year.

“We are obviously disappointed that not all of our campuses met AYP standards, but I am proud of the majority of our students who continued to perform well,” Superintendent Jesús Chávez said. “As is evidenced by the number of campuses and districts which are not meeting federal standards, I believe it is time that the No Child Left Behind Act be reevaluated.”

In the fall, Duncan gave states the option to file a waiver to be exempt from the AYP requirements, saying that states needed relief from the requirements and that the reauthorization of the act was “moving too slowly in Congress.” Texas was among a handful of states that did not apply for the waiver.

“Our student performance remains strong, but it’s not keeping pace with the rapidly escalating federal standards,” said Tim Savoy, spokesman for the Hays school district.

Leander Superintendent Bret Champion said the district will continue to use the information to help identify areas where the district needs additional support and resources and make campus improvement plans for the 2012-13 school year.

The federal requirements are different from those under the state’s accountability system. In previous years, the federal yearly progress standard was based on participation and performance on the state-mandated Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills, as well as graduation and attendance rates.

This spring, students took a new state test, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness. STAAR passing standards still have not been set for elementary and middle school, but because the state was required to measure yearly progress, the agency translated students’ performance on the new, more rigorous tests to a score on the old TAKS.

The AYP evaluations are based on the 10th grade performance on TAKS, as well as the translated scores on STAAR for grades 3 through 8.

More complete information on AYP results, is located on the Texas Education Agency site.

Correction: This story has been updated to reflect the total percent of all Texas schools that failed the Adequate Yearly Progress standards.

Preliminary 2012 AYP Results Available Now!

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) has just posted your preliminary 2012 AYP data tables to the public.  These public versions of the AYP data tables are masked in order to comply with the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).  The…

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