Is It Time to Dump Calendar Time and Letter of the Week?

I know – calendar time and letter of the week is a tradition. It’s something you’ve always done. It’s something that you just never want to give up. Perhaps it’s time for you to read about what teachers are doing now and what experts say about making our time with our young students meaningful and developmentally appropriate.

Here is an excerpt from a teacher’s blog titled Say Goodbye to calendar time!  Click Here

Here is a little preview…. “I love what Amanda Morgan says in the Bam Radio Interview  when it comes to what is most important in the process of building a valuable morning greeting/circle time experience: “…an emphasis on meaningful language and having conversations with children because that is really important and one of the big building blocks of literacy that is more important than some of the rote activities that is common in many practices.” In regards to the length of morning greeting time Amanda states, “I don’t think we can put a number on it because it really does just need to be responsive to the children that we have in our group…”

Also, here is an interview to Heather Shumake, an advocate for free, unstructured play in homes and schools.

Here is a preview… “We’ve always done it this way is never ever ever a valid reason to continue practices that have no real value to the children. Trying to force such an adult concept such as time on the little ones makes no more sense than asking them to wear adult size shoes.”

Say Goodbye to Calendar Time!

Recently a fellow Pre-K teacher shared on Facebook a Blog Post that titled Say Goodbye to calendar time!  The title quickly caught my eye as this is something we have been emphasizing in our trainings at Region 13 and during our coaching visits.

Here is a preview of the blog post:

Why I said goodbye to Calendar time? I realized that young children do not truly develop a sense of time in terms of dates, months, and years until well after their preschool years. Yes, they can memorize the months of the year and the days of the week. And yes, they can memorize counting up to 31. And yes, they can see that all these numbers and letters are organized in a neat package on our morning greeting board.

However, when I asked myself, “Is the precious time we spend every day on these kinds of rote drills truly the most meaningful and valuable use of our time?” or “Does calendar time lead to meaningful conversations” or “Does calendar time assist in building a strong community” or “Are the children loving the process?” I had to say “no.”

……

Hello to Greeting time

….. Most of our morning greeting routine is simple and depending on the children’s interest, the entire amount of time we spend together each morning as a community varies. I love what Amanda Morgan says in the Bam Radio Interview when it comes to what is most important in the process of building a valuable morning greeting/circle time experience: “…an emphasis on meaningful language and having conversations with children because that is really important and one of the big building blocks of literacy that is more important than some of the rote activities that is common in many practices.” In regards to the length of morning greeting time Amanda states, “I don’t think we can put a number on it because it really does just need to be responsive to the children that we have in our group…”

 

If you have been doing calendar time for a while and think you can’t give it up completely try to do it gradually and start to incorporate some new activities to your Morning Circle Time. I promise you will find value in doing so!

Want to learn more? Read  Calendar Time: Good Intentions Gone Awry by Sallee J. Beneke, Michaelene M. Ostrosky and Lilian G. Katz