May 2013 Changes to SPP 11 (Child Find) and SPP 12 (EC Transition)

Effective immediately there are 2 changes to the data you will collect for State Performance Plan (SPP) 11 (Child Find) and 12 (Early Childhood Transition).

In SPP 11 you will need to collect data on the number of children referred and completed between July1, 2012-June 30, 2013 as before. In this summer’s data entry you will need to know the “number of students with evaluation report written within 60 calendar days from receipt of signed, written parental consent or district maintained detailed records of reason for delay described in CFR §300.301 (d)”. You will need to know “number of students with eligibility determined by ARD committee within 30 calendar days from the date of the evaluation report”. Also collect the data for students not completed in those timelines. In other words we are collecting data on the 60 and 30 day timelines instead of last year’s 90 day timeline. This new 60/30 is more in line with what the law requires.

The other change is that students we count in SPP 12 (Transition) will no longer also be counted in SPP 11 (Child Find).

The TEASE application page has been reorganized to reduce confusion in placement of data.

These changes are in response to feedback from LEAs, ESCs, and OSEP.

The latest information is posted in our livebinder at www.bit.ly/spptexas I am working on collection data sheets for each of these 2 indicators to help your staff in collecting the data. They will look like the TEASE screens and have places for all the data TEASE requires. They will be available so you can take the data electronically or simply print them for hard copy. They will be available in Livebinder soon. Stay tuned!

TEASE opens for data entry on July 1, 2013.

For any questions regarding SPP 11 and 12 please contact

Brenda Bush at Region 13

brenda.bush@esc13.txed.net

512-919-5206

May 2013 Changes to SPP 11 (Child Find) and SPP 12 (EC Transition)

Effective immediately there are 2 changes to the data you will collect for State Performance Plan (SPP) 11 (Child Find) and 12 (Early Childhood Transition). 

In SPP 11 you will need to collect data on the number of children referred and completed between July1, 2012-June 30, 2013 as before.  In this  summer’s data entry you will need to know the “number of students with evaluation report written within 60 calendar days from receipt of signed, written parental consent or district maintained detailed records of reason for delay described in CFR §300.301 (d)”.  You will need to know “number of students with eligibility determined by ARD committee within 30 calendar days from the date of the evaluation report”.  Also collect the data for students not completed in those timelines.  In other words we are collecting data on the 60 and 30 day timelines instead of last year’s 90 day timeline.  This new 60/30 is more in line with what the law requires. 

The other change is that students we count in SPP 12 (Transition) will no longer also be counted in SPP 11 (Child Find).

The TEASE application page has been reorganized to reduce confusion in placement of data.

These changes are in response to feedback from LEAs, ESCs, and OSEP. 

The latest information is posted in our livebinder at www.bit.ly/spptexas  I am working on collection data sheets for each of these 2 indicators to help your staff in collecting the data.  They will look like the TEASE screens and have places for all the data TEASE requires.  They will be available so you can take the data electronically or simply print them for hard copy.  They will be available in Livebinder soon.  Stay tuned!

TEASE opens for data entry on July 1, 2013.

For any questions regarding SPP 11 and 12 please contact

Brenda Bush at Region 13

 brenda.bush@esc13.txed.net

512-919-5206

Group Instruction #6: Relax

This is the last part of our six-part Inclusion Series with Katie Adams, speech-language pathologist at McNeil High School in Round Rock ISD. We have learned about how to address social skills, language comprehension and expression, choice-making and emotional regulation. Check out the lessons:

How are You?
Question Time
Choice Time
Feelings
Listen Up

Let’s take a look at Relax, the sixth, and final, component of this hour-long, inclusive class lesson:


What’s the Goal? The purpose of Relax is to allow opportunity for students to reflect on the previous five lessons. This is also an opportunity to gather data obtained by the educational assistants. Brief dialogue for planning purposes can also take place during this time. Remember, using a few seconds here-and-there to communicate with educational team members is useful. In a school setting, on occasion, it is more effective and efficient to have short conversations to plan than to set aside a lengthier meeting.

Do students relax in the same manner? Students have a chance relax and absorb the information in a manner that is most conducive to their learning style. Some students may put their head down. Other students may sit and close their eyes. This is also an opportunity for students to have autonomy over how they want to take a break.

Is this functional? Research states that we need to have rest periods when learning. This mental break results in better retention of information.

Our mental load increases when at school. It is important to understand that for students (and teachers) to continually be effective, we need to give opportunity for rest. Katie is giving this purposeful opportunity to her students. She is also teaching students to self-advocate when they need a break. In other words, students can self-determine when a break is needed based on personal fatigue and overload, make the request and carry out the necessary energy recoupment strategies.

Thank you for participating in our Inclusion Series. And, thank you to Katie Adams, McNeil High School and Round Rock ISD for their resources. Katie will also be presenting this series at Beat the Heat, Region 13’s three-day professional development opportunity for educators who work with children ages 3-5 and children with significant disabilities ages 6-21. Click on the following link for details: Beat the Heat

Join SETI

Special Education Teachers Interactive

The Special Education Teachers Interactive network is an email forum for teachers to share ideas and experiences across multiple districts. It is sponsored by the Region 13 AGC team but the email correspondence is two-directional: this is a venue for member teachers to discuss issues that are important to special education.

To Join the Special Education Teachers Interactive network, enter your name and email below:

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Master Scheduling, Inclusion Science, Free Books, and More!

Several items of interest for educators working to support inclusion settings:

1. Cathy Miller’s presentation on Master Scheduling with inclusion in mind, No More Square Pegs in Round Holes, is now available as a free webinar: http://www4.esc13.net/agc/webinars/ This 45-minute presentation gives administrators access to a host of tools to make sure that students with disabilities are being given access to the general curriculum in the least restrictive environment appropriate.

2. Performance Based Assessment in the Science classroom is now open for registration. Teachers working in Science classrooms grades K-8 will be interested in this workshop designed to help generate more meaningful assessment of student work. Special emphasis will be given to creating meaningful rubrics and differentiating assessment to determine the needs of all learners. More info on E-Campus.

3. Remember that the first 100 registrants for the June 14 Inclusion Institute will receive a complimentary copy of keynote speaker LeAnn Nickelsen’s book: Deeper Learning. Spots are still available on E-Campus.

4. Summer workshop opportunities abound at Region 13, including Power of Inclusion (a revamped version of the popular Power of Two training), Accommodations Central, Operation J.O.Y., and more. Download the flyer for the full schedule of AGC workshops here: AGC Flyer

Group Instruction #5: Listen Up

This is the fifth part of our six-part Inclusion Series with Katie Adams, speech-language pathologist at McNeil High School in Round Rock ISD. We have learned about how to address social skills, language comprehension, choice-making and emotional regulation. Check out the lessons:

How are You?
Question Time
Choice Time
Feelings

 
Let’s take a look at Listen Up, the fifth component of this hour-long, inclusive class lesson:


What’s the Goal? The purpose of Listen Up is to increase independence when following one, two and three step simple directions.

Are visuals used?
Visuals are used to cue students about the directives being given.

Do they get a chance to practice? Students have a chance to come up to the board to practice their skills. Students at the tables are given the opportunity to check peer’s work.

Is technology involved? Katie uses the Smart Board.  This provides a large, clear visual for students.

Is this functional? We are continually bombarded with directives throughout the day.  Having the capability to follow directions gives a student independence.  With this lesson, you are teaching your students how to be functional, interactive, responsive members of society.

How long is the prep time, really?! Katie creates a one page PowerPoint to use with lesson.  This takes 10 minutes.

 
Katie is incorporating various language concepts (e.g., prepositions, directional words). She is also giving multiple-step directions. How would you differentiate this lesson to students? Here are ways to scaffold the lesson:

1. Individualize the number of directives. Some students may only do one step. Work at the student’s level. Once mastery is determined, increase the level of demand.
2. Use objects/nouns familiar to the student. Remember, this task involves a) identification of the object and b) comprehension of the directive. Determine which skill you would like to address.
3. Once students are able to follow the 3-step directives, have him/her give the directives.
4. Change wait time between the verbalization of the directive and the execution. For some students, have them wait until all 3 directives are given before execution.

The possibilities are endless. This task can also be generalized to various parts of the school day. Have students practice by listening to directions for cleaning up the room, completing a task/activity or playing a game. Peer interaction is also key for maintenance of a skill. Model and practice this skill with peers. So, it is definitely time to Listen Up!

Group Instruction #4: Feelings

This is the fourth part of our six-part Inclusion Series with Katie Adams, speech-language pathologist at McNeil High School in Round Rock ISD. We have already learned about three great methods for addressing social skills, language comprehension and choice-making. Check out the previous three FUNctional lessons:

How are You?
Question Time
Choice Time

Let’s take a look at Feelings, the fourth component of this hour-long, inclusive class lesson:



Here, Katie outlines the details of this lesson:

What’s the Goal? The purpose of Feelings is to recognize, interpret, and model facial expressions to increase social skills.

Are visuals used?
Real pictures of students, teachers and staff members are used. This is not only motivating, but it also makes this activity more functional, engaging and applicable. Pictures of high-public figures is also extremely motivating for students.

Do they get a chance to practice? Students practice facial expressions with their paraprofessionals and peers. Peer interaction is essential for learning communication and social skills’ generalization. Katie creates a built-in opportunity to have peer interaction in this lesson.

Why Does Katie Use Sign Language? Sign Language is shown to students as a visual cue to express emotions.

Is this functional? Absolutely! Understanding personal feelings, how feelings are conveyed and personal accountability for social scenarios is vital for navigating social interchanges.

How long is the prep time, really?! The PowerPoint is saved, and 1 to 2 new pictures are added each month. This takes a total of 10 minutes.

Katie is addressing an important and relevant skill. More importantly, she is giving the students an opportunity to practice with one another. The students are learning, and they are keeping one another accountable. Through this simple lesson, the SLP is creating a community for the students. What can Katie do for students who have already mastered Emotion Identification? Teaching students how to manage and self-regulate emotions is a functional skill, as well. Kari Dunn Buron’s Incredible 5 Point Scale is a great tool to teach students emotional regulation.  The following chart, created by Dunn & Curtis, is an example of how to implement a point scale:

Remember, our goal is to have our students become self-advocating, communicative, productive and happy members of society. And, it is a privilege to have the opportunity to make such an impact in our students’ lives. Bravo McNeil High School and Miss Katie Adams!