Write Powerful PLAAFPs and Standards-Based Goals!

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There are many aspects to writing a complete Individualized Education Program (IEP). This one-day training will focus on writing powerful PLAAFP statements which will lead to student-focused goals.  Participants will leave with easy-to-use tools to support their efforts for well-written IEPs.  This intensive instruction includes participant practice and reflection.  This training is for ANY special education teacher (PPCD to high school) who writes IEPs.

IEP Best Practices: PLAAFP and Goal Writing

December 11, 2018

9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

$45

Register for this workshop, FA1839269, in Ecampus.

For additional information, contact Kim West at kim.west@esc13.txed.net

Are you a special education instructional leader?

Join us for the Special Education Instructional Network – SPIN – to connect and learn with other special educators in Region 13.

SPIN meets four times during each school year. Our first 2018-2019 meeting is on Wednesday, September 12, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM.

SPIN meetings are designed for special education instructional leaders to receive updates and resources and to share ideas, district news, and questions with each other.  This year, our meetings will include a book study, UDL Now! A Teacher’s Guide to Applying Universal Design for Learning in Today’s Classrooms, by Dr. Katie Novak.  In addition, Region 13 Specialists will join us to provide behavior guidance and assistive technology information.

You can register for SPIN meetings for FREE in Ecampus by using course number FA1839043.

For more information, contact Kim West, kim.west@esc13.txed.net

2018 STAAR Online Testing Issues

 

The Commissioner has addressed the online testing issues experienced in April and again in May.

In April, the event impacted students taking the grades 5 and 8 mathematics, 4 and 7 writing and English I tests.  In May, the event primarily impacted students taking the grades 3-8 reading test.

During the April 2018 administration of STAAR, 41,702 students were testing online.  Of the 278,434 tested students served in special education, 14,673 were testing online and were impacted.

During the May 2018 administration of STAAR, approximately 29,307 students encountered a connectivity slowdown of approximately 90 minutes. Of the 278,434 tested students served in special education, 4,594 were testing online and were impacted.

Waiving SSI Requirements for Students Impacted by the Online Testing Issues

Students in grades 5 and 8 who were directly affected by either of the online testing issues above and who did not perform satisfactorily on the May 2018 assessment, will not be required to retest during the June 2018 SSI administration.

Districts should determine, on an individual student basis, whether accelerated instruction should be offered for students who did not pass the assessment in May. For the 2017–2018 school year, districts are not required to convene grade placement committees based on results from the affected subject test. Instead, districts should use local discretion and all relevant and available academic information (e.g., the recommendation of the teacher and the student’s grade in each subject) to make appropriate promotion/retention decisions for these students.

The complete press release can be found here: To The Administrator Addressed .

For additional information contact your campus or district testing coordinator.

 

 

 

Announcing the Region 13 Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Professional Learning Community (PLC)!

 

Are you looking for a way to transform your teaching and your students’ learning?

Submit your application to join the Region 13 Universal Design for Learning Professional Learning Community!  This PLC is designed to provide cohort members with an understanding of the UDL framework, knowledge and resources to support UDL implementation, and individualized learning opportunities to address campus needs.

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a framework for creating an approach to your instruction based on principles that allow all students to have access to the general education curriculum. Using a proactive approach to remove learning barriers by considering the natural variability of how students learn, UDL provides a blueprint for creating instructional goals, methods, materials and assessments to help optimize learning.

In addition, knowledge and implementation of UDL supports ESSA’s endorsement of UDL, enhances our connections to the student-centered focus of our appraisal systems, and provides a way to plan for social and emotional variability.

The UDL PLC application process is simple!  Just complete pages 3 and 4 of the application and submit it electronically by 5:00 PM on June 15, 2018.  To submit the application or for more information contact Kim West at kim.west@esc13.txed.net or 512-919-5314.

UDL Series: Universal Design for Learning and Social Emotional Learning

“Emotion has a substantial influence on the cognitive processes in humans, including perception, attention, learning, memory, reasoning, and problem solving” (Tyng, Amin, Saad, & Malik, 2017).

Each day, teachers experience the challenging connections between emotion and learning.  The good news is that we can plan for social and emotional variability in our classrooms by referencing the UDL Guidelines for concrete suggestions for applying the  UDL framework.

Within the principle of engagement, we find strategies for recruiting interest, sustaining effort and persistence, and promoting self-regulation for our students.  By tapping into students’ interests in various ways, we provide meaningful access to our content.  When we provide options for students to sustain attention, we encourage them to build their skills that support learning.  When students have options for self-regulation, they begin to internalize the social and emotional skills necessary for interacting with and retaining content.

Reflect on the strategies you implement to provide access, build skills, and promote internalization of attention and effort.  Compare the UDL principle of engagement with the Core Social and Emotional (SEL) Competencies.  How can you eliminate barriers in your curriculum and environment related to social and emotional variability?

Join us monthly through July as we discuss the following topics and how the UDL framework can help you close the gap in student achievement. This blog series will culminate with a workshop by Katie Novak, our UDL Distinguished Speaker, on July 27th, 2018!

UDL Blog Series:

For more information, contact Kim West, kim.west@esc13.txed.net.

Important Updates for the 2018 Spring STAAR Administrations

On April 5, 2018, Commissioner Morath issued a document entitled, “Important Updates for the 2018 Spring STAAR Administrations.”  This document addresses changes in medical exemptions for STAAR, transcribing student responses, and classroom displays during testing.

The April 2018 issue of the Student Assessment Newsletter contains these updates as well as links to the PDFs regarding medical exemptions and transcribing.  This information is in the Test Administration Updates section.

You can also find the newsletter and these new PDFs on the TEA Student Assessment Overview page in the What’s New in Student Assessment section.

For more information, contact Kim West kim.west@esc13.txed.net.

 

UDL Series: UDL in Your Lesson Plan Goals

So far in the blog series we’ve learned about the myth of the average student and how the UDL Guidelines offer a systematic, predictable way to plan for every learner. How will you plan for learner variability this semester?

Patti Kelly Ralabate, in her book, Your UDL Lesson Planner, focuses on a six-step process for planning with UDL which involves: 1) defining goals, 2) considering learner variability, 3) determining appropriate assessments, 4) choosing methods, materials and media, 5) implementing a lesson, and 6) reflecting on the lesson.  The first step is to design clearly defined learning goals.

Our students need learning goals that are purposeful, flexible, and measurable.  Goals should reflect the purpose of the lesson instead of activities related to the topic.  Next, teachers must decide how they will know when students have mastered the knowledge or skills.  The goals should be written in a way that allows all students to attain them and should include scaffolds that offer additional support to some students.  The way a goal will be measured informs potential assessments.

Sample Starter Goal

Notice how the new goal focuses on the purpose of the lesson and does not restrict the students in their responses.

 

Reflect on your learning goals.  Dr. Ralabate asks:

“In what ways do you currently hold all learners to high expectations and still address their different strengths and challenges?

Are your learners clear about the purpose of your lesson?

To what extent are your goals flexible?”  

Use these ten CAST Tips when developing your goals.

Join us monthly through July as we discuss the following topics and how the UDL framework can help you close the gap in student achievement! This blog series will culminate with a workshop by Katie Novak, our UDL Distinguished Speaker, on July 27th, 2018!

UDL Blog Series:

For more information, contact Kim West, kim.west@esc13.txed.net.

Ralabate, P.K. (2016). Your UDL Lesson Planner. Baltimore, Marylanc: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

UDL Series: Universal Design for Learning and the Every Student Succeeds Act

We hope this Universal Design for Learning (UDL) blog series is helping you find ways to use the framework in your classroom and that you are sharing what you learn and implement with others.

Now that we have introduced UDL and have seen how it can be used to meet the needs of all learners, let’s look at the federal guidance on using UDL in our classrooms.

 


Another perspective on this is

Read more about UDL in the ESSA and other federal laws and plans.

Reflect on your instruction that provides a “personalized, rigorous learning experience.”  How might the ESSA expectation influence your practice?  Could the UDL framework support your efforts?  Are you willing to share your successes with others?

Join us monthly through July as we discuss the following topics and how the UDL framework can help you close the gap in student achievement! This blog series will culminate with a workshop by Katie Novak, our UDL Distinguished Speaker, on July 27th, 2018!


Registration now available for the workshop:
UDL Now! A Guide to Classroom Application with Author Katie Novak

Participants can choose to attend face-to-face workshop or online workshop.

Register now for face-to-face workshop

Register now for online workshop


UDL Blog Series:

For more information, contact Kim West, kim.west@esc13.txed.net.

Are you a special education instructional leader?

Join us for the Special Education Instructional Network – SPIN – to connect and learn with other special educators in Region 13.

SPIN meets four times during each school year. Our first 2017-2018 meeting is on Wednesday, September 13, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM.

SPIN meetings are designed for special education instructional leaders to receive updates and resources and to share ideas, district news, and questions with each other.

You can register for SPIN meetings in Ecampus by using course number FA1737127.

For more information, contact Kim West, kim.west@esc13.txed.net

Student Assessment TETN Schedule

Mark your calendars for the September 12 TETN to receive the latest updates and training on STAAR Accessibility!

This TETN is open to districts as well as Education Service Centers. It may be viewed at Region 13 or from districts that are members of the Distance Learning Network by contacting Distance Learning at distancelearning@esc13.txed.net or 512.919.5444.

For more information, contact Mark Billingsley, District Assessment, Mark.Billingsley@esc13.txed.net

Title: STAAR Accessibility Updates
Time: 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM (CST)
Audience: Open to ESCs and districts
Event#: 293
Summary: This TETN will serve as the state-level training for regions, districts, and campuses regarding 2018 statewide assessment accommodation policies. Presenters will discuss where to find accommodation information, how to determine student eligibility for accommodations, and how to document accommodation decisions and use. Questions will need to be routed through ESCs and will be answered as time allows.
Contact: Student Assessment Division

For additional information, contact:

Student Assessment Division
1701 North Congress Avenue
Room 3-122A
Austin, Texas 78701
(512) 463-9536

student.assessment@tea.texas.gov