UDL Series: UDL in Your Lesson Plan Goals

So far in the blog series we’ve learned about the myth of the average student and how the UDL Guidelines offer a systematic, predictable way to plan for every learner. How will you plan for learner variability this semester?

Patti Kelly Ralabate, in her book, Your UDL Lesson Planner, focuses on a six-step process for planning with UDL which involves: 1) defining goals, 2) considering learner variability, 3) determining appropriate assessments, 4) choosing methods, materials and media, 5) implementing a lesson, and 6) reflecting on the lesson.  The first step is to design clearly defined learning goals.

Our students need learning goals that are purposeful, flexible, and measurable.  Goals should reflect the purpose of the lesson instead of activities related to the topic.  Next, teachers must decide how they will know when students have mastered the knowledge or skills.  The goals should be written in a way that allows all students to attain them and should include scaffolds that offer additional support to some students.  The way a goal will be measured informs potential assessments.

Sample Starter Goal

Notice how the new goal focuses on the purpose of the lesson and does not restrict the students in their responses.

 

Reflect on your learning goals.  Dr. Ralabate asks:

“In what ways do you currently hold all learners to high expectations and still address their different strengths and challenges?

Are your learners clear about the purpose of your lesson?

To what extent are your goals flexible?”  

Use these ten CAST Tips when developing your goals.

Join us monthly through July as we discuss the following topics and how the UDL framework can help you close the gap in student achievement! This blog series will culminate with a workshop by Katie Novak, our UDL Distinguished Speaker, on July 27th, 2018!

UDL Blog Series:

For more information, contact Kim West, kim.west@esc13.txed.net.

Ralabate, P.K. (2016). Your UDL Lesson Planner. Baltimore, Marylanc: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

FIE to IEP – the ABCs of a Well-Written Plan

Team workFIE to IEP pictureThere are many aspects to writing a complete Individualized Education Program (IEP). These documents, when well-written, can be assets to the students they are designed for as well as their teachers.  It takes a multidisciplinary team to create such dynamic and effective plans.

This two-day training will focus on combining the details of a Full Individual Evaluation (FIE) with the knowledge of good instructional practice to write powerful PLAAFP statements which will lead to student-focused goalsTeams that include both assessment personnel and special education teachers will benefit from working together during these two days.

Participants will leave with tools to support their efforts for well-written IEPs aligned to the standards.  This intensive instruction will allow time for participant practice, reflection, and  individual questions.

IEP Best Practice: FIE to IEP

January 5 and 6, 2017

9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Register for this workshop, SP1736044, in Ecampus.

For additional information, contact Kim West, kim.west@esc13.txed.net or

Joy Hunsucker, joy.hunsucker@esc13.txed.net

 

Write Powerful PLAAFPs and Standards-Based Goals!

IEP picture IEP title

There are many aspects to writing a complete Individualized Education Program (IEP). This one-day training will focus on writing powerful PLAAFP statements which will lead to student-focused goals.  Participants will leave with easy-to-use tools to support their efforts for well-written IEPs.  This intensive instruction includes participant practice and reflection.  This training is for ANY special education teacher (PPCD to high school) who writes IEPs.

IEP Best Practices: PLAAFP and Goal Writing

December 6, 2016

9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Register for this workshop, FA1634655, in Ecampus.

For additional information, contact Kim West at kim.west@esc13.txed.net